The 7 Life Stages of Mail: Couples

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Finding their feet, building a future – before, after or without kids. This group of people respond to messages which involve their home, community and social life. These people are 26% more likely to have bought or ordered something as a result or receiving addressed mail.  
 

Couples’ attitudes to mail tend to cluster around the average for all groups. Compared to Fledglings and Sharers, they are beginning to take a more structured approach to their mail.

 

 
 

Couples are focused on friends, but operating as a “unit”
  • – Like Sharers, Couples are socially active. But they are conscious of their status as a ‘unit’ and responsibilities to each other. Overall, they are exhibiting longer-term perspectives.
  • – Still enjoying new experiences, but building (stylish) lives beyond the thrill of the moment.
  • – Mail is becoming more ‘normal’: Couples take a more ordered approach than Sharers to dealing with mail and its contents, but less so than Young Families and Older Families.

 

 

Living space may influence how couples treat mail
  • – Some Couples, particularly younger ones, may live in smaller accommodation. Mail may therefore take a shorter, faster journey around the home, dealt with or disposed quickly.
  • – Making your message clear and unambiguous on the envelope and in the contents will help drive attention and action.
  • – Mail may be dealt with outside the home so digital response mechanisms are important. Mail may also be discussed with colleagues or friends.

 

 

Letterbox drops play a role for local amenities and businesses
  • – Couples pay more attention to their home and their local area. Door drops by local businesses or localised operations of larger companies are likely to resonate.

“I received a booklet from estate agents; a property magazine, and I actually bought my house from the info that was advertised within it – off plan – and I got quite a good deal.”

Stephen, Couples respondent

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: The Life Stages of Mail, 2016

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7 Reasons to Use Direct Mail

1. THE MAIL MOMENT
Direct mail enters an individual’s home and is consumed on a one-to-one basis. This gives you much more time with your customer, time to engage them in a relaxed environment
at a time of their choosing.

2. SENSORY EXPERIENCE
The physicality of a mailing adds another dimension to the brand experience. Using your customers’ senses, you can stimulate and entertain, getting them to reassess your
brand and drive response.

3. PRECISION TARGETING
Direct marketing works best when it’s made relevant for the recipient, with tailor-made content appealing directly to the consumer. New digital printing technology can make this
personalisation even easier.

4. MAKE PEOPLE ACT
Direct mail is the most likely form of communication to get a response from a customer, with the cost of every response
measured with accuracy. As it’s a tangible object, DM is also likely to hang around.

5. EFFECTIVENESS
Reports have demonstrated the enduring effectiveness of direct mail, with the Direct Mail Association stating 65% of consumers
of all ages have made a purchase as a result of direct mail.

6. GET CREATIVE
Direct mail is unique in that mailings can be produced in a wide variety of formats, using different shapes, sizes, colours and materials to create a surprising and memorable brand experience that will stay in the home for weeks and even months.

7. INTEGRATION
Adding direct mail to an integrated campaign can raise the campaign’s effectiveness by up to 62% (BrandScience), while bridging technologies such as QR codes and augmented reality make it simple for consumers to go from print to digital.

Source: VoPP
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